Electric Athenaeum was inspired, in part, by the idea that science fiction, as a genre, is inherently collaborative. Evidence of this can be seen from the early days of genre magazines, where readers were actively encouraged to respond to the stories they read. Readers and writers came together in clubs and at conventions to celebrate and discuss works of science fiction, fantasy, horror, and other, stranger works. The SFF subculture grew and flourished, fans became writers became critics became academics and so on, an ongoing feedback loop of creation and conversation.

Each issue of Electric Athenaeum aims to build on this idea and foster conversation around a specific theme or idea in SFF. Our debut issue, for example, focuses on the theme of For Future Generations and plays with ideas of conservation and sustainability, examines tropes including generation ships and terraforming, and questions what current generations owe to the future of humanity.

Stories, poems, and articles will be tagged with accompanying hashtags, so it’s easy to join the conversation on social media.

Thanks for reading!

Our Team

Powder

Powder

Editor-in-Chief

Powder is a writer, a PhD student, and a researcher of all things pursuant to bargains, exchanges, and compacts of a faery nature. It is inadvisable to attempt to make a deal with him. He has been, in the past, a reluctant cowboy, an Ivy League collegian, and an itinerant marketing professional. Mostly harmless.

He is currently a student at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge. As a result, books on folklore and fairy tales frequently threaten to gobble him up as he strikes out into the woods of academia. The things he’s found so far in the shadows are furnishing the pages of a novel comprised of unequal parts fairy tale and alternate history, somewhere on the border between steampunk and gaslamp fantasy.

Marc Weal

Marc Weal

Submissions Editor

I am currently studying a Publishing MA at Anglia Ruskin University after completing my English Literature BA at theUniversity of Reading.

 

I took time out between the two courses to travel Southeast Asia and discovered a love for vegetarian cooking. Feeling inspired, my partner and I started a blog called The Vegebible that can be found on Instagram and Twitter @the_vegebible,and a website is currently in the works.

 

I still find time after juggling my studies and the blog to indulge in YA fantasy and epic High fantasy series.

Ginger Thomason

Ginger Thomason

Poetry Editor

Ginger Lee Thomason was born and raised in Utah, and she currently lives in Cambridge, England. She’s working on her PhD in Creative Writing at Anglia Ruskin University, under the supervision of Dr. Tiffani Angus. She completed her BA in Creative Writing and English at Southern New Hampshire University in 2014 and her MFA in Writing with Fairleigh Dickinson University in 2016.

Her creative writing thesis is a high fantasy novel titled How to Cook a Dragon, which can be described as The Lord of the Rings meets The Great British Bake Off. The accompanying critical commentary will focus on how food imagery and food tropes are used in world-building and characterization within the speculative fiction genre.

Emma Vavare

Emma Vavare

Submissions Reader

Emma Vavare was born in Stockholm, Sweden and moved to the Aaland Islands in Finland at the age of 9. These days she studies Writing & English Literature Ba(Hons) at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge, UK.

When she is not studying she writes, does digital art, is a DM in the tabletop game Dungeons & Dragons and knits (in that particular order). She has always had a passion for science fiction and fantasy literature. When Emma is not discussing or thinking about her studies or passion she likes to spend time with her three cats back home.

Chandra Clarke

Chandra Clarke

Editorial Assistant

Chandra Clarke is a Creative Writing PhD student at Anglia Ruskin University.

Chandra has a diploma in robotics, a BA in English and Psychology, an MSc in Space Exploration Studies, and a certificate in fiction writing. She began her career as a freelance reporter, contributing to a variety of online and print publications before becoming a managing editor of a weekly community paper. She eventually left that position to start her own company, which was recently acquired.

Her PhD project, is a near-future science fiction novel that explores how new technologies are adopted, how they are spread, and the ripple effects they have on society.